Kodachrome Memory
American Pictures 1972 - 1990
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Young farmwoman waiting at the kitchen door at Lorien Farm in Ne

American Photo Magazine picks Kodachrome Memory: American Pictures 1972 – 1990 in its selection for “Best Books of the Year – Documentary.” Also a winner in “Best of the Year in General Photography” by Amazon.com!

http://www.amazon.com/b?node=7734018011

Reviews on Amazon:

“This is a great book. You will like this book in you just love historical photos or you are a professional photographer wanting to pick up how another person views the world.” — Flying Dutchman, October 13, 2013

“The quality of the images is great and the photography is excellent. This book shall be in every photo enthusiast library.” — Javier F. Alonso, October 9, 2013

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Even if you’ve never seen Nathan Benn’s photographs from the 1970s, they feel somehow familiar–like the refrain of a half-remembered song. With a uniquely American mix of formality and ease, and a color palette so tart you can almost taste it, Benn makes the past vividly–even painfully–present. So there’s nothing nostalgic about his pictures of parades, homecomings, and town meetings, juke joints and barbershops, front porches and back roads, because you are there. Maybe that’s why KODACHROME MEMORY: American Pictures 1972-1990 feels like an instant classic.  – Vince Aletti

KODACHROME MEMORY celebrates the significance of American regional diversity, as it was 30 or 40 years ago before the advent of Internet culture and before the country became one vast strip mall stretching from sea to sea. The seeming inconsequential subject of Benn’s photographs – which are keenly observed and evocative of a time and place – act as metaphors for American culture and values. Although much of Benn’s work was done for a magazine and not gallery walls, his use of color throughout holds its own with artists of the period such as William Eggleston and Stephen Shore.  – Richard Buckley

It is a happy and welcoming cruise down Nathan Benn’s KODACHROME MEMORY lane. The subtlety in images somehow communicated an intimacy now absent in the current binary techniques.  So welcome to a wonderful world now passed but not forgotten.  – Elliott Erwitt

 

 

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